What is slow RMAN or Media Management Library?

Backup execution time  is slow.. where is the problem?

When we perform backup using third party software and backup of database is slow, there always is some uncertain who is causing the slowness.

The Database Administrator (DBA) says: is Media Management Library (aka MML) and Backup Operator says: is RMAN.

To end this conflict I ​​will show how to identify where is the problem.

I'll use the term RMAN (like RMAN spend time), but actually means Database spend time. Because RMAN is only a client. So typically the database is slow and not RMAN Client is slow.

Note: I will not diagnose what is causing it, I will only  help you  identify whether the problem is, in  MML or RMAN.

Media Management

The Oracle Media Management Layer (MML) API lets third-party vendors build a media manager, software that works with RMAN and the vendor's hardware to allow backups to sequential media devices such as tape drives. A media manager handles loading, unloading, and labeling of sequential media such as tapes.

RMAN Interaction with a Media Manager

RMAN does not issue specific commands to load, label, or unload tapes. When backing up, RMAN gives the media manager a stream of bytes and associates a unique name with this stream. When RMAN must restore the backup, it asks the media manager to retrieve the byte stream. All details of how and where that stream is stored are handled entirely by the media manager. For example, the media manager labels and keeps track of the tape and names of files on each tape, and automatically loads and unloads tapes, or signals an operator to do so.

RMAN provides a list of files requiring backup or restore to the media manager, which in turn makes all decisions regarding how and when to move the data.

Before RMAN making a call to any of functions in the media management API, the server create a EVENT WAIT. So, These with  EVENT WAIT  is possible to get the number of  wait (in seconds or number) that the server has been waiting for this call to return.

So, we can calculate it and find out how much time RMAN spend waiting MML (e.g writing  or querying a backup piece filename) processing request and return to RMAN.

Complete list  EVENT of MML

Oracle 11.2 or above:

SELECT NAME
FROM   V$EVENT_NAME
WHERE  NAME LIKE '%MML%';
NAME
----------------------------------------
Backup: MML initialization
Backup: MML v1 open backup piece
Backup: MML v1 read backup piece
Backup: MML v1 write backup piece
Backup: MML v1 close backup piece
Backup: MML v1 query backup piece
Backup: MML v1 delete backup piece
Backup: MML create a backup piece
Backup: MML commit backup piece
Backup: MML command to channel
Backup: MML shutdown
Backup: MML obtain textual error
Backup: MML query backup piece
Backup: MML extended initialization
Backup: MML read backup piece
Backup: MML delete backup piece
Backup: MML restore backup piece
Backup: MML write backup piece
Backup: MML proxy initialize backup
Backup: MML proxy cancel
Backup: MML proxy commit backup piece
Backup: MML proxy session end
Backup: MML datafile proxy backup?
Backup: MML datafile proxy restore?
Backup: MML proxy initialize restore
Backup: MML proxy start data movement
Backup: MML data movement done?
Backup: MML proxy prepare to start
Backup: MML obtain a direct buffer
Backup: MML release a direct buffer
Backup: MML get base address
Backup: MML query for direct buffers

Previous version of Oracle Database 11.2 the Event name MML does not exists because it’s was changed on version 11.2 from %STB% to %MML%.

So, If you are using Oracle 11.1 or previous you can query V$EVENT_NAME where NAME like '%sbt%'.

SELECT NAME
FROM   V$EVENT_NAME
WHERE  NAME LIKE '%sbt%';

Backup: sbtinit
Backup: ssbtopen
Backup: ssbtread
Backup: ssbtwrite
Backup: ssbtbackup
.
.
.

So, lets start...
Oracle store statistics (cumulative, since database was started) of these wait on v$system_event. I always use GV$ because is very common we admin RAC env on this days.

Before start backup I'll take a snapshot intial of gv$system_event...by creating a table RMAN_MML_EVENT_T1.

Click on icon "View Source" to see formated text.

CREATE TABLE  RMAN_MML_EVENT_T1 AS
SELECT inst_id,
  event,
  TOTAL_WAITS,
  TOTAL_TIMEOUTS,
  TIME_WAITED,
  AVERAGE_WAIT,
  TIME_WAITED_MICRO,
  sysdate as SNAPSHOT_TIME
FROM gv$system_event
WHERE event LIKE 'Backup%';

SQL> select * from RMAN_MML_EVENT_T1;

   INST_ID EVENT                                   TOTAL_WAITS TOTAL_TIMEOUTS TIME_WAITED AVERAGE_WAIT TIME_WAITED_MICRO SNAPSHOT_TIME
---------- --------------------------------------- ----------- -------------- ----------- ------------ ----------------- -----------------
         1 Backup: MML initialization                      371              0       54365       146.54         543651136 08-08-12 17:11:05
         1 Backup: MML create a backup piece               450              0        4827        10.73          48270960 08-08-12 17:11:05
         1 Backup: MML commit backup piece                 450              0        7417        16.48          74172281 08-08-12 17:11:05
         1 Backup: MML shutdown                            371              0          47          .13            469267 08-08-12 17:11:05
         1 Backup: MML query backup piece                  894              0       11222        12.55         112222166 08-08-12 17:11:05
         1 Backup: MML extended initialization             371              0           0            0              3655 08-08-12 17:11:05
         1 Backup: MML delete backup piece                 444              0        5348        12.05          53480530 08-08-12 17:11:05
         1 Backup: MML write backup piece              1378078              0     3053683         2.22        3.0537E+10 08-08-12 17:11:05

8 rows selected.

I started backup using RMAN and MML (Tivoli Storage Manager). When backup finished you can query V$RMAN_BACKUP_JOB_DETAILS to get accurate time of backup

SELECT START_TIME,
  END_TIME,
  ROUND(INPUT_BYTES  /1024/1024/1024,2) IMPUT_GBYTES ,
  ROUND(OUTPUT_BYTES /1024/1024/1024,2) OUTPUT_GBYTES,
  INPUT_TYPE,
  ELAPSED_SECONDS
FROM V$RMAN_BACKUP_JOB_DETAILS
WHERE TRUNC(START_TIME) = TRUNC(SYSDATE)
AND INPUT_TYPE LIKE 'DB%';

START_TIME        END_TIME          IMPUT_GBYTES OUTPUT_GBYTES INPUT_TYPE    ELAPSED_SECONDS
----------------- ----------------- ------------ ------------- ------------- ---------------
08-08-12 17:23:44 08-08-12 17:26:38        12.85         10.06 DB FULL                   174

In my case the backup full take 174 seconds to backup read 12.85GB and Write on MML 10.06GB of data

So, after backup finish I take the 2nd snapshot by creating the table RMAN_SNAPSHOT_T2.


CREATE TABLE  RMAN_SNAPSHOT_T2 AS
SELECT inst_id,
  event,
  TOTAL_WAITS,
  TOTAL_TIMEOUTS,
  TIME_WAITED,
  AVERAGE_WAIT,
  TIME_WAITED_MICRO,
  sysdate as SNAPSHOT_TIME
FROM gv$system_event
WHERE event LIKE 'Backup%';

SQL> select * from RMAN_MML_EVENT_T2;

   INST_ID EVENT                                   TOTAL_WAITS TOTAL_TIMEOUTS TIME_WAITED AVERAGE_WAIT TIME_WAITED_MICRO SNAPSHOT_TIME
---------- --------------------------------------- ----------- -------------- ----------- ------------ ----------------- -----------------
         1 Backup: MML initialization                      373              0       54665       146.56         546652333 08-08-12 17:27:45
         1 Backup: MML create a backup piece               454              0        4860        10.71          48604759 08-08-12 17:27:45
         1 Backup: MML commit backup piece                 454              0        7482        16.48          74820999 08-08-12 17:27:45
         1 Backup: MML shutdown                            373              0          47          .13            471590 08-08-12 17:27:45
         1 Backup: MML query backup piece                  900              0       11281        12.53         112808077 08-08-12 17:27:45
         1 Backup: MML extended initialization             373              0           0            0              3665 08-08-12 17:27:45
         1 Backup: MML delete backup piece                 446              0        5373        12.05          53727006 08-08-12 17:27:45
         1 Backup: MML write backup piece              1419274              0     3067298         2.16        3.0673E+10 08-08-12 17:27:45

8 rows selected.

Now I can calculate the values from RMAN_MML_EVENT_T2 minus RMAN_MML_EVENT_T1 to get the real time spend on MML.
Note:
EVENT: Name of the wait event
TOTAL_WAITS: Total number of waits for the event
TOTAL_TIMEOUTS: Total number of timeouts for the event
TIME_WAITED: Total amount of time waited for the event (in hundredths of a second)
AVERAGE_WAIT: Average amount of time waited for the event (in hundredths of a second)
TIME_WAITED_MICRO: Total amount of time waited for the event (in microseconds)

SELECT t1.inst_id,
  t1.event,
  t2.total_waits       - t1.total_waits total_waits,
  t2.total_timeouts    -t1.total_timeouts total_timeouts,
  t2.time_waited       - t1.time_waited time_waited,
  t2.time_waited_micro - t1.time_waited_micro time_waited_micro
FROM RMAN_MML_EVENT_T1 T1,
  RMAN_MML_EVENT_T2 T2
WHERE t1.inst_id = t2.inst_id
AND t1.event     = t2.event;

   INST_ID EVENT                                   TOTAL_WAITS TOTAL_TIMEOUTS TIME_WAITED TIME_WAITED_MICRO
---------- --------------------------------------- ----------- -------------- ----------- -----------------
         1 Backup: MML initialization                        2              0         300           3001197
         1 Backup: MML create a backup piece                 4              0          33            333799
         1 Backup: MML commit backup piece                   4              0          65            648718
         1 Backup: MML shutdown                              2              0           0              2323
         1 Backup: MML query backup piece                    6              0          59            585911
         1 Backup: MML extended initialization               2              0           0                10
         1 Backup: MML delete backup piece                   2              0          25            246476
         1 Backup: MML write backup piece                41196              0       13615         136141912

8 rows selected.

As I can see above the MML spend more time writing backup piece.

So, I'll sum the time to get total time spend on MML.

SELECT SUM (total_waits) total_waits,
  SUM(total_timeouts) total_timeouts ,
  SUM (time_waited)/100 time_waited_in_second,
  SUM (time_waited_micro) time_waited_micro
FROM
  (SELECT t1.inst_id,
    t1.event,
    t2.total_waits       - t1.total_waits total_waits,
    t2.total_timeouts    -t1.total_timeouts total_timeouts,
    t2.time_waited       - t1.time_waited time_waited,
    t2.time_waited_micro - t1.time_waited_micro time_waited_micro
  FROM RMAN_MML_EVENT_T1 T1,
    RMAN_MML_EVENT_T2 T2
  WHERE t1.inst_id = t2.inst_id
  AND t1.event     = t2.event
  )

TOTAL_WAITS TOTAL_TIMEOUTS TIME_WAITED_IN_SECOND TIME_WAITED_MICRO
----------- -------------- --------------------- -----------------
      41218              0                140.97         140960346

Calculating time total of backup window, time spend on MML and time spend of RMAN.

Note: TIME_SPEND_BY_RMAN = (ELAPSED_SECOND_BACKUP-TIME_SPEND_BY_MML_SECOND)

ELAPSED_SECONDS_BACKUP          TIME_SPEND_BY_MML_SECOND       TIME_SPEND_BY_RMAN_SECOND
------------------------------ ------------------------------ -------------------
174                             140.97                         33.03

Summarizing:
Total time of backup : 174
Time spend by MML: 141
Time spend by RMAN : 33

If this backup is slow is because MML take (141*100/174) 81% of time spend of backup window.

Additional info:
As my backup was done over Lan:
(10.06GB * 1024 = 10301MB)
10301MB / 144 = 71Mbytes/second

As I'm using network interface of 1 Gbit I can consider a normal throughput.

Also you can monitoring in real time where is wait.

Just execute this script above:

Note : if you are using previous version of 11.2 change %MML% to %sbt%.

vi monitoring_mml.sh
sqlplus -s sys/<password>@<db_name> as sysdba<<EOF
set echo off
COLUMN EVENT FORMAT a17
COLUMN SECONDS_IN_WAIT FORMAT 999
COLUMN STATE FORMAT a15
COLUMN CLIENT_INFO FORMAT a30
set linesize 200

select to_char(sysdate,'dd-mm-yyyy hh24:mi:ss') actual_date from dual;

SELECT p.SPID, sw.EVENT, sw.SECONDS_IN_WAIT AS SEC_WAIT, 
       sw.STATE, CLIENT_INFO
FROM   gV\$SESSION_WAIT sw, gv\$SESSION s, gV\$PROCESS p
WHERE  sw.EVENT LIKE '%MML%'
AND    s.SID=sw.SID
AND    s.PADDR=p.ADDR;
EOF
exit

Using shell execute the command above, and you will see in real time the wait on MML.

while true
do
sh monitoring_mml.sh
sleep 1
done

.

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Oracle Express Edition (XE) 11g (11.2.0.1) Avaliable

Oracle Database Express Edition 11g Release 2

Free to develop, deploy, and distribute

Oracle Database Express Edition 11g Release 2 (Oracle Database XE) is an entry-level, small-footprint database based on the Oracle Database 11g Release 2 code base.  It’s free to develop, deploy, and distribute; fast to download; and simple to administer.

Oracle Database XE can be installed on any size host machine with any number of CPUs (one database per machine), but XE will store up to 11GB of user data, use up to 1GB of memory, and use one CPU on the host machine.

Download

Avaliable only to Windows x32 and Linux x64

Download Link: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/express-edition/downloads/index.html

Feature Availability

  • Options and Major Features Not Included
  • Application Development, Language, and Database Features
  • Availability/Backup and Recovery Features
  • Security Features
  • Manageability Features
  • Data Movement/Integration Features
  • Networking Features

Options and Major Features Not Included

The following options and major features are not included with Oracle Database XE:

  • Development Platform
    • Oracle Precompilers (Pro*C/C++, Pro*Cobol)
    • SQLJ
  • High Availability:
    • Automatic Block Repair
    • Block change tracking for fast incremental backup
    • Block-level media recovery
    • Duplexed backup sets
    • Fast-start fault recovery
    • Flashback Database
    • Flashback Data Archive
    • Flashback Table
    • Flashback Transaction
    • Lost Write Protection
    • Online index rebuild
    • Online index-organized table organization
    • Online table redefinition
    • Oracle Active Data Guard
    • Oracle Data Guard-Redo Apply
    • Oracle Data Guard-Snapshot Standby
    • Oracle Data Guard-SQL Apply
    • Oracle Fail Safe
    • Oracle RAC One Node
    • Parallel backup and recovery
    • Rolling Upgrades-Patch Set, Database, and Operating System
    • Tablespace point-in-time recovery
    • Trial recovery
    • Unused block compression in backups
    • Oracle Total Recall
  • Scalability
    • Automatic Workload Management
    • Oracle Real Application Clusters
  • Security
    • Advanced Security Option
    • Fine-grained auditing
    • Oracle Database Vault
    • Oracle Label Security
    • Oracle Virtual Private Database
    • Secure External Password Store
    • SecureFiles Encryption
  • Performance
    • Client Side Query Cache
    • Database Smart Flash Cache
    • In-Memory Database Cache
    • PL/SQL Function Result Cache
    • Query Results Cache
    • Server Flash Cache
    • Support for Oracle Exadata Storage Server Software
    • Xstream
  • Manageability
    • Database Resource Manager
    • Deferred segment creation
    • Instance Caging
    • Oracle Change Management Pack
    • Oracle Configuration Management Pack
    • Oracle Diagnostic Pack
    • Oracle Real Application Testing
    • Oracle Provisioning and Patch Automation Pack
    • Oracle Tuning Pack
    • SQL Plan Management
  • VLDB, Data Warehousing, Business Intelligence
    • Asynchronous Change Data Capture
    • Basic Table Compression
    • Bitmapped index, bitmapped join index, and bitmap plan conversions
    • Deferred Segment Creation
    • In-memory Parallel Execution
    • Oracle Advanced Compression
    • Oracle Data Mining
    • Oracle Data Profiling and Quality
    • Oracle Data Watch and Repair Connector
    • Oracle OLAP
    • Oracle Partitioning
    • Parallel Data Pump Export/Import
    • Parallel index build/scans
    • Parallel query/DML
    • Parallel Statement Queuing
    • Parallel statistics gathering
    • Summary management-Materialized View Query Rewrite
    • Transportable tablespaces, including cross-platform
  • Integration
    • Advanced Replication
    • Database Gateways
    • Messaging Gateway
    • Oracle Streams
  • Content Management
    • Oracle Multimedia
    • Semantic Technologies (RDF/OWL)
  • Spatial and Location Data
    • Multimaster replication of SDO_GEOMETRY objects
    • Oracle Spatial
    • Parallel spatial index builds
    • Partitioned spatial indexes
  • Networking
    • Infiniband Support
    • Oracle Connection Manager

Application Development, Language, and Database Features 

Feature Availability
SQL*Plus Yes
Integrated Web Application Development Environment Yes (Oracle Application Express, no Application Express application authentication using Oracle Application Server Single Sign-On)
Database Web services No
PL/SQL stored procedures and triggers Yes
PL/SQL server pages Yes
PL/SQL native compilation Yes
JDBC drivers Yes (client-side JDBC only)
Java support in the database No
Java Server Pages No
Java native compilation No
SQLJ No
XML support in the database Yes (no JNDI, or Servlet support)
Native .NET data provider support Yes (Windows only)
ASP.NET Providers Yes (Windows only)
OLE DB support Yes (Windows only)
ODBC support Yes (Windows and UNIX)
.NET Stored Procedures Yes (Windows only)
Microsoft Distributed Transaction Coordinator support Yes (Windows only)
COM Automation No (Windows only)
Oracle Objects for OLE (OO4O) No (Windows only)
Windows VLM Support, 4GB RAM Tuning No (Windows only)
Large Page memory support Yes (Windows only)
Active Directory integration Yes (Windows only; no storing of tnsnsames.ora file in Active Directory)
DML triggers Yes
Database event triggers Yes
Instead-of triggers Yes
Index-organized tables Yes
Temporary table Yes
Data Compression No
Objects and Extensibility Yes
LOB (large object) support Yes
Oracle Text Yes (English/French Knowledge Bases not supplied, nor are the following features: RULE_CLASSIFIER, SVM_CLASSIFIER, and KMEAN_CLUSTERING)
Oracle Locator Yes
Function-based index Yes
Bitmapped index, bitmapped join index No
Regular Expressions Yes
Sample Scan Yes
SQL Model Yes
SQL Analytic functions Yes
Summary Management No
Materialized View Query Rewrite No
Star query transformation Yes (B-tree indexes only)
Parallel query/DML No
Parallel statistics gathering No
Parallel index build/scans No
Parallel export/import No
Globalization support Yes (limited character sets and language translations; seeOracle Database Express Edition Installation Guide)
Multiple block size support Yes

Availability/Backup and Recovery Features

Feature Availability
Drop column Yes
Rename column, constraint Yes
Online schema reorganization/redefinition No
Flashback Query Yes
Flashback Table No
Flashback Database No
Flashback Transaction Query No
Server-managed backup and recovery No
Online Backup Yes
Backup Unused Block Compression No
Backup Encryption No
Incremental backup and recovery Yes (no change tracking file or optimized incremental backup capability)
Duplexed backup sets No
Fast-Start Selectable Recovery Time No
Block-level media recovery No
Parallel backup and recovery No
Point-in-time tablespace recovery No
Trial recovery No
Rolling Upgrade Support – Patch Set, Database and O/S No
Oracle Logminer Yes

Security Features

Feature Availability
Encryption toolkit Yes
Virtual Private Database No
Fine grained auditing No

Manageability Features

Feature Availability
Automatic Storage Management No
Automatic Datafile Management Yes
Automatic Memory Management Yes
Automatic Undo Management Yes
Automatic Optimizer Statistics Management Yes
Server-generated Alerts Yes
Database Resource Manager No

Data Movement/Integration Features

Feature Availability
Direct Path Load API Yes
External tables Yes
External procedures Yes
Synchronous Change Data Capture No
Asynchronous Change Data Capture No
Transportable tablespaces, including cross-platform No
Advanced Queuing Yes
Basic Replication Yes (read-only and updateable materialized view site only)
Advanced Replication No
Distributed queries Yes
Distributed transactions Yes
Transparent Gateways No
Generic connectivity Yes

Networking Features

Feature Availability
Directory connectivity No

For more details: http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E17781_01/license.112/e18068/toc.htm

Database Express Edition Documentation 11g Release 2 (11.2)

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E17781_01/index.htm

Enjoy


Cluster Health Monitor (CHM)

Oracle is strongly encouraging the admins of Clusterware / RAC using the CHM (Cluster Health Monitor).
This tool (formerly known as Instantaneous Problem Detector for Clusters or IPD/OS) is designed to detect and analyze operating system (OS) and cluster resource related degradation and failures in order to bring more explanatory power to many issues that occur in clusters where Oracle Clusterware and Oracle RAC are running such as node eviction. It tracks the OS resource consumption at each node, process, and device level continuously. It collects and analyzes the cluster-wide data. In real time mode, when thresholds are hit, an alert is shown to the operator. For root cause analysis, historical data can be replayed to understand what was happening at the time of failure.

See this presentation on this issue on link below

Introduction
– What is? Why use? Where to get?
Cluster Health Monitor (CHM)
• Installation
– Of the Tool
– Of the GUI
• CHM in Action
• Administration
• FAQ & More Information
– OTN Migration

Everything_you_ever_wanted_to_know_about_CHM

Enjoy…


EMC CLARiiON: Oracle Database 10g/11g/11gR2 with Storage Replication Consistency

Introduction

This white paper is intended of database and system administrators interested in implementing backup and remote disaster protection plan on Linux and Windows Plataform for Oracle databases using the consistenty features of EMC CLARiiON SnapView nad MirrorView/S. The reader should be familiar with Oracle Database software and ASM and EMC CLARiion SnapView and MirrorView replication  technologies.

Click link below…

h2104-emc-clariion-db-stor-sol-oracle-10g-oracle-11g-clariion-stor-repltn-wp

Enjoy


Comparison of 32-bit and 64-bit Oracle Database Performance on the Dell PowerEdge 6850 Server with Microsoft Windows Server 2003

In 32-bit mode, faster processor speeds, faster bus performance, and faster components throughout will contribute to improved performance.

In 64-bit mode, there are additional performance advantages that can be attributed to the superiority of the 64-bit processing model over the 32-bit processing model. In particular, Oracle instances that utilize System Global Area memory allocations larger than 4 GB will benefit from improvements in the handling of Very Large Memory with the 64-bit architecture.

While the advantages of 64-bit architecture for large System Global Areas (SGA) are fairly well known, it is less commonly understood how the 64-bit model will benefit user scalability.

With the 32-bit implementation of Very Large Memory for Microsoft Windows, it is difficult to scale Oracle to support large user populations. The 64-bit version of Microsoft Windows Server 2003 will support scalability for large user populations.

Dell commissioned Performance Tuning Corporation to compare the performance of Oracle databases on 32-bit Microsoft Windows Server 2003 and 64-bit Oracle databases on the Microsoft Windows Server 2003 version for the EM64T processor.

Test results for scaling both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Oracle databases for large user populations will be discussed.

Click link below…

oracle_performance_em64t_6850

Enjoy


Troubleshooting: Oracle Clusterware/Database on Windows

 

OracleCRService Will Not Start

Could not start the OracleCRService service on Local Computer.
Error 1067: The process terminated unexpectedly.

[  clsdmt][2580]Listening to (ADDRESS=(PROTOCOL=tcp)(HOST=127.0.0.1)(PORT=61200))
[  OCRAPI][3888]a_is_valid_user_group: User name [wnt-sim\27235] not in user database
[  OCRAPI][3888]a_is_valid_user_group: scls ret [27] slos [Information of error OS: Category: [1234] Operation: [scls_iddb_get_user_id_by_name] : [LookupAccoun]  Others: [LookupAccountName failed]  Dep: [1332]]
[  OCRAPI][3888]a_create_key: THE SECURITY ATTRIBUTE PASSED is invalid user [wnt-sim\27235] group []
2011-02-08 17:32:46.835: [  CRSOCR][3888]32OCR api procr_create_key failed for key SYSTEM.crs.versions.config_versions.
OCR error code = 32OCR api procr_create_key failed for key SYSTEM.crs.versions.config_versions. OCR error code = 27 OCR error msg: PROC-27: Error in authentication layer Authentication error [SLOS error information: Category: [1234] Operation: [scls_iddb_get_user_id_by_name] Location: [LookupAccoun] Other: [LookupAccountName failed] Dep: [1332]] [1][ default][3888]Error in writing config version to OCR

Solution:

OracleCRService Will Not Start Due To Unavailability of CRS Install Owner User Account [ID 601299.1]

https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&doctype=PROBLEM&id=601299.1


OUI Clusterware/RAC reports ‘access denied’

During the final stage (Remote operations) of a RAC install (CRS or RDBMS), the installer reports an error while copying files to a remote node.

WARNING: Error while copying directory C:\oracle\product\10.2.0\crs with exclude file list
'C:\DOCUME~1\oracle\LOCALS~1\Temp\OraInstall2011-02-07_09-14-01PM\installExcludeFile.lst' to nodes 'NODE2'.
[PRKC-1073 : Failed to transfer directory "C:\oracle\product\10.2.0\crs" to any of the given nodes "NODE2 ". Error on node NODE2:Access denied]

Solution:
Disable Antivirus while install Oracle CRS or RAC

Or use this note…

RAC install reports ‘access denied’ error while copying files to remote node [ID 373470.1]

https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&doctype=PROBLEM&id=373470.1


Runing patch102.bat fails with process running on Windows

C:\oracle\product\10.2.0\crs\install>patch102.bat
Successful validation check of Oracle CRS services status
Failed to patch all the files in the ORA_CRS_HOME C:\oracle\product\10.2.0\crs
Please ensure that all processes running from the home have been stopped.

Solution:

ERROR: “FAILED TO PATCH ALL THE FILES IN THE ORA_CRS_HOME…” running patch102.bat on Windows [ID 415526.1]

https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&doctype=PROBLEM&id=415526.1



Best Practices for Oracle Database 10g RAC on Microsoft 64bit Windows

Excellent document that shows the best  practices for 64 bit Windows

See link below

best-practices-rac_10g-on-64bit

Enjoy